Recent Corrections Made to this Site

This page is for listing changes made to the site: mainly corrections or reassessments of identifications. Some of these will have been documented in Indentification Corner.
If you are aware of any similar mistakes on my site, please let me know!
 
Date of Change Country Detail Source of information
December 2014 St. Vincent
affected stamp Detail
SG 5799b issued 2009
News that St. Vincent will produce a WWF issue for a "Sandpiper" was surprising as very few species of Sandpiper occur regularly on the islands. While checking what had been previously issued and any recent bird news I found that the photograph on this stamp also includes Red Knot (Calidris canutus) in the background. I will add this in my next update.
Correspondent
November 2014 Syria
affected stamp Detail
Issued 2013
I was sceptical about the name on the stamp for this bird, Cinereous Bunting, so listed it as unidentified. In the set issued in 2009, a bird labelled "Syrian Serin" was found to be taken from a photograph of a Cinereous Bunting, and in this set the bird labelled "Syrian Serin" looks more like a European Serin. I considered the bird on this stamp to be too yellow and its bill too slender for the named species. Also, there seemed to be no eye-ring. However, a note from a correspondent prompted me to have another look, and this time I found the source photograph of a Cinereous Bunting. I will correct this in my next update.
Correspondent
July 2014 Samoa
affected stamp Detail
Issued 2013
The bird on this stamp is supposed to be Samoan Triller (Lalage sharpei), but photographs of this species show that it is greyish and has no white in the wings or supercilium. The closest image that I could find for the bird on this stamp is here, which makes this a Polynesian Triller (Lalage maculosa), a very variable species. I will correct this in my next update.
Correspondent
Djibouti
affected stamp Detail
SG 920
I have listed this as African Spoonbill (Platalea alba), but the black bill and yellow on the breast identify the bird as a Eurasian Spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia). I will correct this in my next update.
Personal observation
March 2014 Niger
affected stamp Detail
Issued 2013
Although the scientific name on this stamp indicates that the birds are Copper Sunbird (Cinnyris cupreus), the design is derived from two photographs of Copper-throated Sunbird (Leptocoma calcostetha). I will correct this in my next update.
Personal observation
February 2014 Chad
affected stamp Detail
Issued 1999
Although the scientific name on this stamp indicates that the bird is an African Spoonbill (Platalea alba), all the other stamps for this species show a red face, bill and legs. In my opinion the bird is more like Eurasian Spoonbill (Platalea leucorodia), which also occurs in Chad. I will correct this in my next update.
Personal observation
December 2013 China
affected stamp Detail
SG 4675
A correspondent pointed out that the bird on this stamp looks more like Temminck's Tragopan (Tragopan temminckii), and looking at photographs on the web, at first I agreed. However, the cheeks of the bird on the stamp are orange which is right for Cabot's Tragopan, whereas the cheeks of Temminck's should be blue. I shall leave this as Cabot's Tragopan (Tragopan caboti)
Correspondent
October 2013 New Zealand
affected stamp Detail
SG 1291
When this stamp was issued in 1987, Howard and Moore listed "Brown Teal" as Anas aucklandica. Clements split Anas aucklandica into 3 species, including the flightless species of the same name. The bird on this stamp clearly has functioning wings and should be more correctly identified as Anas chlorotis. I shall correct this in my next update.
Clements (2000) Updated 2001.
September 2013 Solomon Is.
affected stamp Detail
SG 308
I've just realised that the scientific name on this stamp is correct and is the only Buttonquail listed for the Solomon Islands. It is correctly shown as Red-backed Buttonquail (Turnix maculosa). I have corrected this in my latest update.
Personal observation
  Bhutan
affected stamp Detail
SG 824
I've just realised that the scientific name on this stamp is misleading. The English name "Indian Crested Swift" is even listed in Howard and Moore as "Hemiprocne coronata", and this is the only species of Tree Swift listed for Bhutan. I shall correct this in my next update.
Personal observation
April 2013 Palau
affected stamp Detail
SG 1885
A correspondent has pointed out that the bird on this stamp looks more like Great Thick-knee (Esacus recurvirostris), and not Beach Thick-knee (Burhinus magnirostris) as stated on the stamp. There are many photographs of both species online. Here are two examples: Great Thick-knee Beach Thick-knee
The head pattern, bill shape and wing bar are distinguishing features. I shall correct this in my next update.
Correspondent
March 2013 Gambia
affected stamp Detail
New 2011
While adding information about a new issue featuring hornbills, I noticed that this stamp is obviously showing a Yellow-billed Hornbill and not African Grey Hornbill (Tockus nasutus) as stated on the stamp. I have not found the source photograph for this image, and can see no obvious identification feature that would make this either Eastern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus flavirostris) or Southern Yellow-billed Hornbill (Tockus leucomelas). As neither form is found in The Gambia, I shall list it as unidentified and out of range. I shall correct this in my next update.
Personal observation
February 2013 Dominican Republic
affected stamp affected stamp
New 2012
I overlooked that these two labels were not actual postage stamps and included them in my listing. The affected species are Western Chat-Tanager (Calyptophilus tertius) and Ridgway's Hawk (Buteo ridgwayi). I shall correct this in my next update.
Correspondent
December 2012 Iraq
affected stamp Detail
New 2011
While searching for some new stamps from Iraq, I came across this page in Arabic which shows a preliminary design of the 3 stamps issued to commemorate the Ramsar Treaty. The face values changed, but all 3 warblers were labelled as Clamorous Reed-Warbler (Acrocephalus stentoreus). Unfortunately, the names were dropped from the final design. I shall correct this in my next update.
Personal observation
October 2012 Guinea
affected stamp Detail
New 2012
I misread the name of this bird on the stamp and have listed it as Black-casqued Hornbill (Ceratogymna atrata). I have just seen another new issue from Guinea featuring an almost identical image and it is correctly named as Yellow-casqued Hornbill (Ceratogymna elata). I shall correct this in my next update.
Personal observation
September 2012 Malagasy Republic
affected stamp Detail
SG 931
This stamp was issued in a set of 7, which features some species occurring on Madagascar, and some which do not. The name on the stamp suggests that it shows Pied Harrier (Circus melanoleucos), which it clearly does not. I have listed this stamp as having Reunion Harrier (Circus maillardi), mainly because that was listed as the most likely harrier on Madagascar. More recently, Circus maillardi has been split to produce Madagascar Harrier (Circus macrosceles). However, I think the bird on the stamp looks most like Western Marsh-Harrier (Circus aeruginosus), which is listed "Rare/Accidental" for Madagascar.
Personal observation
August 2012 Vietnam
affected stamp Detail
SG 1933
I just realised that the name on the stamp for this bird is incorrect. It is not a Great Grey Owl (Strix nebulosa) but probably a Pel's Fishing-Owl (Scotopelia peli). It is holding a fish in its talons!
Personal observation
Yugoslavia
affected stamp Detail
SG 1861
When I added this stamp to my database, I inadvertantly chose "Rock Ptarmigan" instead of "Rock Partridge". This bird is clearly not the former species, but probably Rock Partridge (Alectoris graeca).
Personal observation
Wallis & Futuna
affected stamp Detail
SG 621
The bird on this stamp is described as "Jeune pigeon vert des isles" (Young green pigeon of the islands) with the scientific name "Ptilinopus greyi". The named species does not appear on the Wallis and Futuna list, but Crimson-crowned Fruit-Dove (Ptilinopus porphyraceus) does.
Personal observation
July 2012 Sudan
affected stamp Detail
SG 485
When this stamp was issued in 1990, Howard and Moore listed it as a subspecies of Eupodotis ruficrista. I overlooked that the subspecies has been recognised as a full species: Buff-crested Bustard (Eupodotis gindiana). I will amend this for my next update.
Clements (2000) Updated 2001.
June 2012 Netherlands
affected stamp Detail
SG 907
I have previously listed this as European Herring Gull (Larus argentatus), but while rescanning some of my older stamps, I noticed that this bird has yellow legs and so is probably a Lesser Black-backed Gull (Larus fuscus)
Personal observation
April 2012 Hungary
affected stamp Detail
SG 2794
I have previously listed this as Goldcrest (Regulus regulus), but having recently rescanned some of my older Hungarian stamps, I realised that this bird looks more like Firecrest (Regulus ignicapillus)
Personal observation
March 2012 Iran
affected stamp Detail
SG 3000
Apparently, the name in Farsi on the stamp is "Common Whitethroat". I have listed this as Asian Desert Warbler (Sylvia nana), but the leg colour was wrong and the wing too long, indicating a long distance migrant such as Greater Whitethroat (Sylvia communis). The bird could be a female.
Correspondent's suggestion
December 2011 Yemen (MKY)
affected stamp Detail
SG 75
I previously listed this as Arabian Woodpecker (Dendrocopos dorae), as I wrongly assumed that the birds in the set could all be native to the Yemen (so did CBoS). I suspect this was the intention, but that the wrong images were chosen for the Yemeni Linnet and the woodpecker. This illustration is very similar to one used on a Western Sahara label dated 1993 which correctly names the species as Greater Yellownape (Picus flavinucha). I suggest that the same illustration of this species was used as the source for both items.
Personal observation
December 2011 Burundi
affected stamp
SG 561
I previously listed this as Spotless Starling (Sturnus unicolor), but have only just noticed this error which must have been a slip of the mouse. The bird is correctly identified on the stamp as European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Neither species is normally found in Burundi.
Personal observation
November 2011 Brazil
affected stamp Detail
SG 2085
I previously listed these Cardinals as Yellow-billed Cardinal (Paroaria capitata), but having recently re-scanned some of my older stamps, I now realise that they are more like Red-cowled Cardinal (Paroaria dominicana). Yellow-billed has a black throat, which these two birds lack.
Personal observation
November 2011 Botswana
affected stamp Detail
SG 220
I've always mistakenly listed this Golden Oriole from Africa as an African Golden Oriole (Oriolus auratus), but having recently re-scanned some of my older stamps, I now realise that it is actually a Eurasian Golden Oriole (Oriolus oriolus). The Eurasian bird shows much more black on the closed wing.
Personal observation
November 2011 Argentina
affected stamp Detail
SG 2341
When I collected this stamp soon after issue, I took the scientific name on the stamp, Egretta thula, as being correct. Now I have reviewed this identity and have decided that the bird is correctly identified by its Spanish name also on the stamp: "Garza blanca" - Great Egret (Ardea alba). The set of 4 stamps are based on paintings by Axel Amuchastegui, an Argentinian artist who portrayed many birds. I wonder if he was aware of this issue, and that two of the four stamps had incorrect scientific names. This change will appear in my next update.
Personal observation
November 2011 Antigua
affected stamp Detail
SG 2328
The name on the stamp incorrectly states that this is a Royal Tern (Sterna maxima) in which case the bird should have an orange bill. This bird has a red bill with a black tip, which indicates that it is a Common Tern (Sterna hirundo). This change will appear in my next update.
Personal observation
October 2011 Georgia
SG 166, 169 and 172
These three stamps are from a set of 16 where the names of the birds are in Georgian. This feature explains why I am correcting these three identifications.
Personal observation
October 2011 Kuwait
affected stamp Detail
SG 593
The name on the stamp correctly states that this is a Blue Rock-Thrush (Monticola solitarius). At the time, I assumed that the orange breast indicated that the bird was actually Rufous-tailed Rock-Thrush (Monticola saxatilis), but I have recently become aware that some races of Blue Rock-Thrush have this feature. Clearly, the bird on this stamp has a blue tail, which is longer than M. saxatilis. As M. saxatilis is a long-distance migrant, its wings are longer, with the tips almost reaching the end of the tail, as can be seen in other examples of this species, particularly the stamp from Switzerland. However, there appears to be a white patch on the back of this Kuwaiti bird, and it is unlikely that an orange-fronted Blue Rock-Thrush would appear there. Consequently, I shall change the identity of this bird to "unidentifiable" in my next update.
Personal observation
July 2011 Comoro Islands
affected stamp Detail
Issued 2009
I carelessly accepted the name on the stamp and assumed this was the first Madagascar Kestrel (Falco newtoni) on stamps. However, I can see the diagnostic head markings of American Kestrel (Falco sparverius), so I will correct this on my next update. I'm surprised nobody drew my attention to this error!
Personal observation
April 2011 North Korea
affected stamp Detail
SG 742
I was never very happy about the identity of the bird on this stamp. Collecting Birds on Stamps (CBoS) lists the species as Black-breasted Thrush (Turdus dissimilis) which is found in southern China and north-eastern India, making it an unlikely candidate for a set which shows indigenous species. The ATA's handbook 106 lists it as probable Grey-backed Thrush (Turdus hortulorum) which is how I listed it. However, I have been using Avibase's website to look at the names of some of these early Korean stamps to compare the Korean name on the stamp with that shown by Avibase. (If the Korean characters do not display, you will have to configure your browser and possibly operating system to enable them.) Studying this stamp has lead to me to believe that the bird is actually a male Eyebrowed Thrush (Turdus obscurus). Although the characters do not completely match, I have marked 3 significant ones on the following image: comparing Avibase and stamp This is a new species on stamps, but Turdus hortulorum no longer appears. I shall change this on my next update.
Personal observation
April 2011 Tawny/Steppe Eagles
I overlooked when Clements 5 was published that Tawny Eagle (Aquila rapax) was split, raising to species level Steppe Eagle (Aquila nipalensis). Aquila rapax is mostly resident in Africa and India, whereas the Steppe Eagle migrates from its mostly Asian breeding range to winter in Africa and India. The stamps affected by this change are from Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Mongolia, Russia and Venda. The last stamp is from a Migratory Birds set and the stamp has a map showing the migration route. The change will occur on my next update.
Clements (2000) Updated 2001.
January 2011 Australia
affected stamp Detail
SG 1963 New Species
I identified the bird on this stamp assuming it was one of a pair of Purple Swamphens, which is the species on the adjacent stamp. A correspondent has pointed out that this bird looks more like a Dusky Moorhen (Gallinula tenebrosa). It is swimming (Swamphens don't swim, or very rarely) and has a brown back, rather than a Swamphen's blue back. I shall correct this on my next update.
Correspondent
November 2010 Ceylon
affected stamp Detail
SG 485
When this stamp was issued in 1964, Howard and Moore listed it as a subspecies of Gracula religiosa. I overlooked that the subspecies has been recognised as a full species: Southern Hill Myna (Gracula indica). I will amend this for my next update.
Clements (2000) Updated 2001.
  Indonesia
affected stamp
SG 2120
When this stamp was issued in 1993, Howard and Moore listed it as a subspecies of Gracula religiosa. I overlooked that the subspecies has been recognised as a full species: Nias Myna (Gracula robusta). I will amend this for my next update.
Clements (2000) Updated 2001.
June 2010 El Salvador
affected stamp
SG 1646
When this stamp was issued in 1980, Howard and Moore listed it as a subspecies of Strix varia. I overlooked that the subspecies has been recognised as a full species: Fulvous Owl (Strix fulvescens). I will amend this for my next update.
Clements (2000) Updated 2001.
May 2010 Korea (North)
affected stamp affected stamp
SG 4879/90
In my November 2009 update, I accidentally switched the identity of the birds on these two stamps. The left stamp features Baillon's Crake (Porzana pusilla) and the right one has Ruddy-breasted Crake (Porzana fusca).
 
January 2010 Zambia
affected stamp Detail
SG 487
When I introduced Clements 5 my method of finding species equivalents with Howard and Moore chose the wrong species in this instance. It found Chestnut-headed Crake (Anurolimnas castaneiceps) which is a species from South America. The H&M name for the bird on this stamp is "Chestnut-headed Crake". The Clements name for this is Chestnut-headed Flufftail (Sarothrura lugens).
 
November 2009 Mexico
affected stamp Detail
SG 2378
A correspondent familiar with birds of Mexico has pointed out that the bird I am currently listing as Spot-tailed Nightjar (Caprimulgus maculicaudus) is much more like Pauraque (Nyctidromus albicollis). "The black markings on the wing and buff colour around the eye are a perfect match for Common Pauraque (Tapacaminos Comun), which would also explain why they only call it tapacamino (being the most widespread of the family)." I shall change this on my next update. "Urraca azul" remains unidentifiable.
 
October 2009 Cuba
affected stamp
affected stamp
SG 1723 and 3152
I overlooked that Clements split the Cuban sub-species of Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) raising to species level Red-shouldered Blackbird (Agelaius assimilis). A new stamp has just been issued with this species which I will include for my next update.
 
November 2008 Taiwan
affected stamp Detail
SG 2673
This has been identified as Bali Myna (Leucopsar rothschildi), but the bird clearly has a crest, and lacks the dark marking around the eye, and the black tip of the tail. On reflection, I think this is most likely to be an albino Crested Myna (Acridotheres cristatellus). I shall correct this for my next update.
 
June 2008 Kyrgyzstan
affected stamp Detail
SG 57
With only the Kyrgyz names of the birds on this set, and only the bird's head, I decided that this stamp had Black Kite (Milvus migrans). However, I checked with Joost van der Ven, author of Birds in Kyrgyz Republic, and he has confirmed that the name on the stamp is Kyrgyz for Short-toed Eagle (Circaetus gallicus). I shall correct this for my next update.
 
June 2008 White-faced Owls
I overlooked when Clements 5 was published that White-faced Scops Owl (Ptilopsis leucotis) was split, raising to species level Southern White-faced Owl (Ptilopsis granti). The two species are obviously split geographically, and I believe the main difference in the field is by call. Following the geographical split, I will alter the following stamps to P. granti: Congo (Kinshasa) 2002, Namibia 1998, Rwanda 1985 and Zimbabwe 1987. I will leave the following as P. leucotis: Gambia 1990 and 1996, and Sierra Leone 1982. The change will occur on my next update.
 
April 2008 Lesotho
affected stamp Detail
SG 794
I overlooked that in 2004 Clapper Lark (Mirafra apiata) was split, raising to species level Eastern Clapper Lark (Mirafra fasciolata). The Eastern species is more likely to be the one found in Lesotho, but the bird on the stamp looks most like what is now called Cape Clapper Lark (Mirafra apiata). An extract from The Larger Illustrated Guide to Birds of Southern Africa illustrates both species and has range maps.
 
April 2008 Guyana
affected stamp Detail
SG 3009
The legend on the stamp identifies this bird as Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus). However, a correspondent in the USA points out that the bird looks more like a Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura): length of tail, contrast in wings, lack of white tips in wings. I shall correct this for my next update.
 
January 2008 Laos
affected stamp Detail
SG 1434
Kjell Scharning has reviewed his identification of the bird on this stamp, and I agree with him that the name on the stamp, for once, is correct! When I first listed this, I was using Howard and Moore who showed "javanicus" as a sub-species of Acridotheres fuscus. Clements has split this and lists it as Javan Myna (Acridotheres javanicus), The pale eyes and bill, together with the white vent, and white terminal band under the tail are sufficient pointers to this bird's identity, though the tail is too long. Unfortunately for my collection, this species does not occur in Laos, but it has been listed in bird-watching trip lists for nearby countries, so perhaps it has escaped from captivity. I shall correct this for my next update.
 
December 2007 Chile
affected stamp Detail
SG 2014
When I received this stamp I listed it as unidentified, as it looked like it showed an albatross but without any distinguishing features. I have since been informed that it shows a monument on Cape Horn representing a non-specific albatross. Here is a close up picture of the monument. I shall remove this stamp from my Chile page for my next update.
 
December 2007 Zil Elwannyen Sesel
affected stamp Detail
SG 66
The name on the stamp is "Aldabra Kestrel". The species of Kestrel found on Aldabra is Madagascar Kestrel (Falco newtoni), but that species is also known as the Madagascar Spotted Kestrel because the chest, belly and underwing coverts are covered with black spots, as can be seen here. The bird on the stamp does not show these spots, and I suspect the illustration originated from the Seychelles Kestrel (Falco araea). I shall correct this for my next update.
 
April 2007 Norfolk Island
affected stamp Detail
SG 922
The name on the stamp is "Procelsterna cerulea albivitta" so why I thought it showed "Gygis alba" escapes me! The Clements list I use split albivitta and calls it "Grey Noddy (Procelsterna albivitta)". This is its first appearance on stamps. I shall correct this for my next update. The species also breeds on Henderson Is, so I will change my Pitcairn stamp to show this species.
 
March 2007 Hong Kong
affected stamp Detail
SG 1399
When initially informed about the names of the birds on this set, I was given "Otus bakkamoena" as the name for Collared Scops Owl. However, the species found in Hong Kong is "Otus lettia".
 
November 2006 Kyrgyzstan
affected stamp Detail
SG 311
Although this stamp bears the local name for Gyrfalcon, it actually shows Saker, as explained here.
 
September 2006 Peru
affected stamp Detail
New
An error in my database caused this bird to be incorrectly listed. The photograph used for the stamp is shown on Aves de Lima. I have corrected this as Bare-faced Ground-Dove (Metriopelia ceciliae).
 
July 2006 Mexico
affected stamp Detail
SG 2379
While reviewing the amazing wildlife sheet of 1996, I realised that this bird does not show enough of a white belly for it to be White-bellied Chachalaca (Ortalis leucogastra). I now agree with Kjell Scharning that this is a Plain Chachalaca (Ortalis vetula), and my next update will show this change.
 
March 2006 New Caledonia
affected stamp Detail
New
I had overlooked that in a 2001 update to Clements' list, the race saissetti of Red-fronted Parakeet was raised to species level.
Clements (2000) Updated 2001.
August 2005 Taiwan
affected stamp Detail
SG 2929
I have previously listed this stamp as showing White-throated Laughingthrush (Garrulax albogularis). However, a correspondent, and keen birder, from Taiwan has pointed out that the bird is most like a Black-throated Laughingthrush (Garrulax chinensis), which has previously appeared on a stamp from Vietnam issued in 1978. An excellent photograph of this species may be seen on the OBC's Image Database. Although not native to Taiwan, the species is seen by birders, and may have escaped from captivity in sufficient numbers to be considered an introduction. Unfortunately, this means that G. albogularis does not appear on postage stamps.
May 2005 Various

When I made the change from Howard and Moore's 1980 list to Clements, 2000, I overlooked that Little Black Bustard (Afrotis afra) was split, raising to species level White-quilled Bustard (Eupodotis afraoides).
Clements (2000).
March 2005 Portuguese Guinea
affected stamp Detail
SG 305
I have previously listed this stamp as showing Black Crowned-Crane (Balearica pavonina) mainly because that species is found in what used to be Portuguese Guinea. However, although the image is not coloured, the cheeks are extensively white which is indicative of Grey Crowned-Crane (Balearica regulorum).
Sudan
affected stamp Detail
SG 479
I have previously listed this stamp as showing Black Crowned-Crane (Balearica pavonina) mainly because that species is found in Sudan. However, although the neck is clearly black, the face pattern is that of Grey Crowned-Crane (Balearica regulorum). Because of this anomaly, I have made this "unidentified".
Cuba
affected stamp
SG 779
I have previously listed this stamp as showing Great Egret (Ardea alba) mainly because of the white bird in the foreground. However, I now realise that this is actually a white form of Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias).
February 2005 Botswana
affected stamp Detail
SG 516
I had overlooked that Clements raised to species level the Miombo Sunbird (Cinnyris manoensis) which was considered to be a sub-species of Lesser Double-collared Sunbird (Nectarinia chalybea) by Howard and Moore.
Clements (2000).
New Zealand
affected stamp Detail
SG 2375
A recent update by Clements has split the Brown Kiwi into 3 species. The stamp issued in 2000 is inscribed 'Okarito Brown Kiwi' (Apteryx rowi), but I have left all the other Brown Kiwi stamps as Southern Brown Kiwi (Apteryx australis).
Clements (2004).
Barbados
affected stamp Detail
SG 624
A recent update by Clements has raised the Barbados Bullfinch (Loxigilla barbadensis) to species level. This was fomerly a sub-species of Lesser Antillean Bullfinch (Loxigilla noctis), and gives Barbados its only endemic species.
Clements (2004).
Japan
affected stamp Detail
SG 1725
A recent update by Clements has raised the Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii) to species level.
Clements (2004).
December 2004 Various

When I made the change from Howard and Moore's 1980 list to Clements, 2000, I overlooked that Spot-billed Duck (Anas poecilorhyncha) was split, raising to species level Pacific Black Duck (Anas superciliosa).The same applies to Augur Buzzard (Buteo augur) and Jackal Buzzard (Buteo rufofuscus).
Clements (2000).
June 2004 New Zealand
affected stamp Detail
SG 822
I have overlooked that Clements raised to species level what is considered by some authorities to be the New Zealand sub-species of the Silver Gull (Larus novaehollandiae). I will list this as Red-billed Gull (Larus scopulinus), another endemic species for New Zealand.
Clements (2000).
May 2004 Jordan
affected stamp Detail
New 2003 100f
I originally listed this as Tawny Eagle (Aquila rapax), despite the name on the stamp. I think the bird is not bulky enough for one of the Aquila eagles. Its slender appearance, relatively small bill and generally dark plumage suggests to me that it is more likely to be a Black Kite (Milvus migrans). The picture on this page shows a bird similar to the one on this stamp.
CBoS and Birding in India and South Asia.
May 2004 Cameroun
affected stamp Detail
SG 968, 1983 30f
I previously listed as Shikra (Accipiter badius). Collecting Birds on Stamps (CBoS) lists the species as Rufous-chested Sparrowhawk (Accipiter rufiventris). I used the French name "L'Epervier" on the stamp to find the closest species in the reference book I used at the time. This is obviously incorrect. A. rufiventris does not occur in the country, and should show a white vent and barred tail. I shall make it unidentified.
CBoS
May 2004 Cameroun
affected stamp Detail
SG 941, 1982 10f
I previously listed as Scaly Francolin (Francolinus squamatus). Collecting Birds on Stamps (CBoS) lists the species as Cameroon Francolin (Francolinus camerunensis). The reference book I used at the time did not illustrate this species, but assigned it to an appendix list. The illustration on this stamp is disappointingly poor for such a rare endemic species. It lacks the red eye patch, and the legs do not look natural. I shall make it unidentified.
CBoS
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